Kiddush Hashem Tattoo

FullSizeRender (24)

I have always loved linguistics. Not the grammar aspect, but languages, word origins, words themselves, how languages evolved over time, how a language reflects the culture around it, dialects, accents, etc. While being the hardest language in the world to learn, and spending YEARS learning it well,  I have  had quite a bit of learning English, thank you very much.

I love learning other languages, even if I’m about 42 years past where the human brain is programmed TO learn more than one language. Fascinating to me is the fact that our brain is created to learn more than one language, but….. if we haven’t learned more than one by about age 7, while we can STILL learn them later in life, the additional brain areas used to learn multiple langauges at that time in our life, either die off, or get pulled into circulation for some other brain function. In essence, those people who learned at least one other language as a young child will forever have access to areas of the brain that those of us who only learned one language, or learned more than one later in life,  will never be privy to.

The Hebrew language fascinates me. Much like several other non-western languages, whole thoughts and paradigm perspectives can be articulated and communicated in a couple of symbols or words….. concepts that would take the English language words….. and more words….. and still MORE words…. to convey.

This tattoo means “Kiddush Hashem”. Kiddush Hashem means,  “to live in such a way as to bring glory to God among those who do not know Him. To live a life of integrity; to do some heroic deed, or to be martyred.”

Ok. So I would rather skip the martyer part. Nobody wants to prematurely die around here. But the rest of it is deeply symbolic for me.

The rest of the meaning is exactly how I’ve chosen to live my life, and how I want to continue to do so. This concept harkens from one of my favorite books in the Bible, Isaiah, specifically 65:1, where Isaiah speaks words of God that have been revealed to him,

“I revealed myself to those who did not ask for me; I was found by those who did not seek me. To a nation that did not call my name, I said, ” Here am I, here am I.”

I wrote a prayer for myself  on October 23, 2011, and posted it on my desk at work for years. It says,

“God, I pray that my life will reflect the intent of Isaiah 65:1, and of kiddush hashem. I pray that the ashes from my own brokenness will fill the air around me, like incense. And that people who don’t even know they have a need for God in their lives, and who do not seek Him in any way, and who don’t call out to Him with any voice, will come to understand, trust, and thrive in a relationship with God, simply  because I make myself a vessel through which there is less and less of me, and more and more of Him. Amen.”

So I inked this tattoo on my foot, symbolizing the desire that my hands and feet always be those that bring Good News, for the purpose of being a sampling of Jesus in human form. That my life is lived in such a way that if people meet me, and if they forget about me, they have lost nothing. But they will know, by interacting with me, that when they meet Jesus, and they forget about Him, they have lost everything.

Shalom.

One thought on “Kiddush Hashem Tattoo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s